Around the County — 7/22/17

Rep. Parrish Nixes In-District Meeting on Her Scheme to Drop-Kick Oregon Medicaid

By Peter Toll

West Linn Republican State Rep. Julie Parrish wants to reduce taxes on Oregon’s wealthiest by dropping some 350,000 from the state’s Medicaid rolls. She’s trying to get it on the ballot. Sounds like an Oregon version of the cruel Trump-McConnell-Ryan scheme in Congress.

Our Oregon, a coalition of public employee union members, has called a meeting August 1 in West Linn to give Rep. Parrish a chance to explain herself and, in the process, perhaps listen to what her constituents might say about the matter.

Though Ms. Parrish is usually an unafraid bulldog in front of hostile groups, she has withdrawn her agreement to attend this affair. Undeterred, Our Oregon and the Oregon Nurses Association are going ahead with their “Protect Healthcare Town Hall.” Continue reading

Clackamas Asks Legislature to Join “Treat vs. Jail” Drug Addict Programs

Should Oregonians consider drug-addicted people as being ill or being criminals? Should they be treated or jailed?

These questions become all the more meaningful in the national opioid crisis currently killing thousands of Americans every month. Is it more humane for the addict and cheaper for society if treatment is implemented?

Clackamas County commissioners said “yes” to the above in testifying before the Oregon Legislature on several bills embracing that path and asking that the law be expanded to include Clackamas. Overall, the results in neighboring Washington and Multnomah counties have been considered positive. Continue reading

Rep. Parrish Would Put Trump GOP Standards on Oregon Health Care

How does Clackamas County feel about repealing Oregon’s version of the Affordable Care Act?

Unlike the federal Republican approach languishing in the Senate, West Linn Republican Rep. Julie Parrish wants Oregon voters to undo the recent bipartisan bill passed by the Oregon Legislature.

She’s gathering signatures across the state now for a ballot measure to overturn HB 2391, which taxes hospitals to help pay for services for those who can’t, approximately one in five Oregonians. Continue reading

HD 38’s Ann Lininger Resigns after Being Named to Bench

Ann Lininger

Candidates for appointment to the House District 38 representative position in the Oregon Legislature will be interviewed soon, as Rep. Ann Lininger, D-Lake Oswego, has been named to the Clackamas County Circuit Court bench by Governor Kate Brown. Rep. Lininger, a former Clackamas County commissioner, was appointed to the House in 2014 when then Representative Chris Garrett was named to a judgeship in the Oregon Court of Appeals.

Selecting someone to fill the balance of her term (through December, 2018) will be done by county commissioners based on the number of voters in the district. Commissioners will be limited to a list of three to five nominees put forth by the Precinct Committee People in HD 38 and ratified by the Clackamas County Democratic Central Committee. A public meeting will be set for the PCPs to meet the aspirants. Continue reading

Intraparty Differences over Clean Air Funding

By William Street

There is a deep historic division in Oregon Democratic circles most commonly referred to as “Jobs versus Environment.” This split crosses industrial lines: workers in extractive industries, such as forestry, are often pitted against workers in less polluting industries. It crosses rural/urban lines since many workers in extractive industries live in rural portions of Oregon.

This historic division appeared again last week when House Democrats refused to fund the governor’s Cleaner Air Oregon initiative. The sum: $1 million to be paid by polluters. Continue reading

Clackamas Projects Omitted in Major Legislation as Transportation Package Gets Fast Green Light

Though seriously lacking in projects for Clackamas County, passage of a $3.8 billion transportation package in the Legislature July 6 should be considered a coup for Governor Kate Brown and Democratic leadership.

HB 2017, which originally contained $5.1 billion in projects, passed the House 39-20 with 36 required in the 60-member House due to the so-called three-fifths rule on revenue (tax) measures. Continue reading