Author Archives: DPCC Admin

Another ‘Oops!’ Our County Clerk Violated Law This Time

Our Clackamas County clerk’s miscues and mistakes are almost legendary. From the worker caught altering ballots, the clerk’s refusal to sign any marriage certificate so that she doesn’t have to sign same sex ones, public money wasted on signature verification equipment, the list is long. (See A ballot-tampering probe highlights a history of problems under the Clackamas County Clerk. )

As bad as these and the rest are, they are not as serious as being found guilty of violating election law. Continue reading

Platform Convention Reflections Part 2: Defending the French

In the midst of a discussion about expanding the role of government to enhance social protections, a delegate arose and cited France as an example of government intervention into the economy run amok. The delegate cited France’s slow GNP growth and overall sluggish economy.

Indeed France’s unemployment rate is about 5 percent higher than the U.S. However, French productivity has exceeded the U.S.’s from 1985 through 2010. But these economic numbers, which are routinely used to determine the health of an economy, miss the mark. The measure of success of any economy isn’t how much wealth it has or even how much it creates. The measure of a successful economy must be the welfare of the people who are served by the economy. Continue reading

Platform Convention Reflections (Part 1)

Democratic Party of Oregon’s annual Platform Convention in March brought more than 500 active Democrats to Salem. The largest delegation was from Clackamas County, our state’s third largest county.

What happens under the “big tent” when you are in a minority and majority rules governs the outcome?

What happens when there are no structures for the minority to have their voice seriously considered, whether that minority is on the left or the right?

Jobs versus the environment has been a major conflict within our Democratic Party since before the Spotted Owl. This conflict has traditionally divided union workers from urban environmentalists. It has divided rural communities from urban financial centers. Those divides were well represented at the Platform Convention. Continue reading

What Will Our Elected Officials Do?

Photo by drburtoni via Creative Commons license.

The TriMet parking lot at Park Ave was full.

The MAX tram into Portland was full.

The North Park blocks were full.

Broadway was full and closed to vehicular traffic.

Pioneer Square was full.

The difference between the Women’s March and the March for Our Lives was the composition of the crowd, far more young people in the streets in the latter event.

For those on the sidelines, for those who failed to march, the question heard most often was: will it make a difference? Continue reading

Lake Oswego Junior High: The Toxic Culture of Racism Must Be Ended

At the March meeting of the Clackamas County Democratic Central Committee, a resolution was adopted unanimously to stand in solidarity with students who experience racial discrimination at Lake Oswego Junior High in general and the most recent example in particular.

The resolution has been forwarded to the Lake Oswego School Board. It states in part:

Many are watching and listening to how the School Board is moving forward to effect needed institutional change. Simply applying a curriculum, no matter how excellent, over atop a toxic culture will not suffice. It gives the appearance of actions without sustainable outcomes.

There is no illusion that the Lake Oswego school system is better or worse then others in regard to this issue. All of our institutions must be on constant vigilance for racism, now that it is being condoned by the highest office in the land.

Continue reading