Category Archives: State of Oregon

There’s Polling and Then There’s Push Polling

By Peter Toll

Has a pollster called lately? Did they try to influence you with an eye to possibly changing your mind? If so, beware. But first a little background.

Independent election and issue polling started in the early 1960s. Some folks named Gallup had a bright idea: “Let’s just ask ’em” when seeking how people felt about a political candidate or a particular issue. Then we can sell the information, they figured, and make some money. They made it statistically sound. Continue reading

Primary Wrapup 2018

There were a few surprises in primary election results this year as only three legislative races attracted more than one Democratic entry. Most hotly contested and most expensive race in the state for the primary:

Senate District 24, spanning Multnomah and Clackamas counties, saw incumbent Rod Monroe facing two Democratic opponents. He went down hard to former State Rep. Shemia Fagan as she amassed over 60 percent of the vote. Kasye Jama, the other challenger, mustered about 12 percent. This was winner-take-all, as no Republican has filed. Continue reading

Platform Convention Reflections Part 2: Defending the French

In the midst of a discussion about expanding the role of government to enhance social protections, a delegate arose and cited France as an example of government intervention into the economy run amok. The delegate cited France’s slow GNP growth and overall sluggish economy.

Indeed France’s unemployment rate is about 5 percent higher than the U.S. However, French productivity has exceeded the U.S.’s from 1985 through 2010. But these economic numbers, which are routinely used to determine the health of an economy, miss the mark. The measure of success of any economy isn’t how much wealth it has or even how much it creates. The measure of a successful economy must be the welfare of the people who are served by the economy. Continue reading

Platform Convention Reflections (Part 1)

Democratic Party of Oregon’s annual Platform Convention in March brought more than 500 active Democrats to Salem. The largest delegation was from Clackamas County, our state’s third largest county.

What happens under the “big tent” when you are in a minority and majority rules governs the outcome?

What happens when there are no structures for the minority to have their voice seriously considered, whether that minority is on the left or the right?

Jobs versus the environment has been a major conflict within our Democratic Party since before the Spotted Owl. This conflict has traditionally divided union workers from urban environmentalists. It has divided rural communities from urban financial centers. Those divides were well represented at the Platform Convention. Continue reading

Labor Caucus Party Unity Forum

The DPO is hosting a program to increase awareness on the history and basics of the Labor Movement and union structure for all who want to more fully understand how and why unions are important to us all. Additional topics will include:

 

  • Apprenticeships
  • BOLI Commissioner’s Job
  • Labor Candidate School
  • Diversity and Equity

When: Saturday, April 7, 9am – 1pm
Where: IBEW 48
15937 NE Airport Way
Portland, OR 97230

For details of the program, see the poster here.

Reflections on Being a Woman, a Minority, a Legislator from Rep. Andrea Salinas

By Diane Jukofsky, Beaver Creek

Members of the Oregon State Legislature, which convened for a short session on February 5, make up one of the most diverse and female-dominant body ever to convene in Salem. In addition, an unusual number of legislators — seven in total — are new, having been appointed to vacated seats. One legislator who fits all these categories is District 38 Representative Andrea Salinas, D-Lake Oswego, who was appointed to the seat formerly held by Ann Lininger, named a Clackamas County judge.

Shortly before the legislature adjourned on March 3, Rep. Salinas shared with Clackamas County Democrats her thoughts on her role in the legislature, her legislative priorities, and offered advice to women and minorities thinking of running for public office. Continue reading