Standing and District Committees May Meeting Roundup

We’re pleased to share the highlights below from Standing and District Committee meetings held in May.

Campaign Committee, chaired by Peter Toll

What happened on May 15th? Read the Primary wrap-up here.

Communications Committee, May 29th; chaired by Simon Springall

With the Primary behind us, we are planning the best ways to communicate with and engage Clackamas County Democrats, as we approach the November election. One new venture for us will be production of podcasts featuring interviews with key candidates. We discussed the most efficient ways to produce and distribute these. For example, we can launch a YouTube channel and reach out to our Facebook followers, asking them what questions they would like to ask candidates.

We will also conduct a survey to find out how Clackamas County Democrats get their information and what media they prefer for receiving and sharing information.
As it’s increasingly important that committees and precincts are able to easily share information and lessons learned with one another, we discussed the best platforms for doing this easily. The envisioned platform, as well as our website, could provide helpful information, such as videos and articles that advise new candidates, campaign managers, recruiters, Precinct Committee Persons, and Neighborhood Leaders how to be most effective.

Fundraising Committee, May 19th; chaired by Anita Gregory

The main topic of discussion was the annual Roosevelt Dinner, to be held on October 6, 2018, at the Tualatin Country Club. Price for a ticket will be $90 per person; $80 for PCP or PCP partner. This is the same price as 2017. A save-the-date announcement will be emailed next week. We will be selling advertisements to be placed in the evening’s program, as well as sponsorships. The prices for both ads and sponsorships will remain the same as 2017, with ads running from $50 to $150, and sponsorships from $250 up to $750. We will solicit items for the live auction.

Silent Auction: Last year we asked each House Districts to donate a basket for the silent auction. This year we will ask the various committees to donate baskets.

Raffle Basket: This year we will have two large baskets of goodies to raffle off, unlike 2017 when we had only one. Donations for the baskets will be solicited by fundraising committee members.

Invitations will be mailed via USPS at the end of August. We will use the same size and style as last year. Our Oregon City Dems’ office volunteers will help prepare the invitations by stuffing the envelopes, applying labels, stamps, and sealing them.

Social Justice Committee, May 9th; co-chaired by Josh Korwin and Mike Kohlhoff; meeting highlights submitted by Mary Post

Committee members Josh Korwin and Alyssa Zukas presented “The Four Justices & How We Eat” and offered delicious vegan foods for us to savor. One guest advised us of the “Hunger Fighters,” a food pantry on Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. at Lakeridge Jr. High School in Lake Oswego. They are open to food donations.

A volunteer from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) shared visuals that shed light on plant food vs. animal food statistics.

Peter Norbye and Mike Kohlhoff advised the group of a lawsuit involving the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, which in January 2017 was expanded by President Obama to include additional ecologically important areas. A timber company and the Association of Oregon and California counties, which includes Clackamas County, filed a lawsuit that would allow this additional land to be harvested for timber. Multnomah County has pulled out of the Association and therefore the lawsuit. Should Clackamas County do the same? Speakers who can address the issue will be invited to our next meeting, and the committee will then develop a recommendation we will submit to the Central Committee.

House District 38 — co-leaders Gary Thompson and Kathy Gordon

While HD38 did not hold a May meeting, the co-leaders communicated frequently with our Neighborhood Leaders, responding to their questions about how to handle issues surrounding the Primary and their turfs and managing their data processing. Getting the Primary material sorted, counted, and collated with the slate cards and into the hands of our Neighborhood Leaders was the main activity.

House District 39, May 19th; co-leaders Naella Tesch and Katie Wynne

At our May meeting, held at Gwynn’s Café in Canby, we welcomed members of a largely Latino group. They learned about our activism when one of our Neighborhood Leaders knocked on the door and met one of their leaders during May’s Get Out the Vote. We had an open and lively discussion about how to help our communities. The Neighborhood Leader Program works!

House District 40, May 20th; co-leaders Faith Leith & Bill Street

HD40 met Sunday, May 20, at the Oregon City Library to discuss canvassing during the 2018 primary. Bill Street’s powerpoint presentation proved the importance of talking to neighbors. Face-to-face contact in our district leads to 55 percent voter turnout instead of 30 percent. The Neighborhood Leader Program works!

Stories were shared: A Trump supporter voting for her Democratic daughter; folks thanked canvassers for their work; where and how to leave slate cards was discussed; how to deal with really big dogs; etc. Training for successful canvassing is scheduled for the general election.
State Senate 20 candidate Charles Gallia is optimistic about the fall campaign. He plans to knock on hundreds of doors this summer – 4,000 by the end of June with help. He’s gathering endorsements from teachers, health professionals, environmental groups, and others. We need to remove Sen. Alan Olsen as our right-wing, climate-change-denier representative in Salem.