Tag Archives: Education

Voting “Yes” on Measure 101 Is Good for Your School District

An op-ed piece by Ginger Fitch, Chair, West Linn-Wilsonville School Board
and Chelsea Martin, Vice-Chair, West Linn-Wilsonville School Board. Reprinted by permission of the authors.

Voters, you need to know that the Oregon School Boards Association, Oregon Education Association, Confederation of Oregon School Administrators, American Federation of Teachers Oregon, Head Start, Oregon PTA and numerous other groups who care about education have all strongly endorsed a “yes” vote on Measure 101.

Why are educators and education advocates for a “yes” on Measure 101? It’s because anyone who works with children knows that our students learn best when they are healthy and have healthcare. Continue reading

Schrader-Lininger Education Town Hall in Lake Oswego

Commissioner Martha SchraderRep. Ann Lininger

 

Clackamas County Commissioner Martha Schrader and state Rep. Ann Lininger will jointly hold a town hall meeting focused on education on Thursday, Oct. 8, at the Lake Oswego City Hall.

This year, the Oregon Legislature made historic investments in the K-12 school and higher education system. All county residents are invited to come share their priorities about education and any other issue.

Lake Oswego City Hall is located at 380 A Ave. The two elected officials will appear at 6 pm.

For more information, members of the public may contact Clackamas County Public Information Officer Tim Heider at 503-742-5911 or theider@clackamas.us

Parrish Opposes Tuition-Free Community Colleges

julie parrish.b-wState Rep. Julie Parrish, R-West Linn, doesn’t think community college tuition should be free. So she and 11 colleagues voted “no” to the idea when SB 81 came before them last week after passing 28-1 in the Senate.

Parrish describes herself as a big supporter of education. However, she is actually a raving fan of charter schools and the conversion of public schools to private. In fact, she has her son in a charter school in the Tigard-Tualatin District, not her home West Linn-Wilsonville District. The latter also has a charter school. Continue reading

A Turning Point for Oregon Schools:
A Message from Gladstone School District Superintendent Bob Stewart

You hear it every day: Oregon’s graduation rate should be much higher. Our students should be achieving more in math, reading, writing, and science. Those things are absolutely true. What will it take to reach our goal, a 100 percent graduation rate?

The Oregonian recently published a series of articles including a comparative analysis that ranks all states’ school performance and education spending. By their calculation, Oregon ranks 38th in student performance and 39th in education funding.

The problem

How do we move Oregon schools from 38th to number one? Continue reading

From the Left Bank
Supreme Court Reversal Raises Tax Issue Afresh

By Peter Toll

persOur State Supreme Court’s recent reversal of the “grand bargain” deal concerning PERS costs and benefits came as little surprise in some circles. Breaking a contract cannot be cavalierly dismissed by legislators and governors.

Despite the well-meaning attempt to fix a vexing problem, the Oregon Supremes said, sorry, no can do. Go back to square one.

This, of course, prompted major headlines and “in-depth” (read re-hash) reporting on how teachers are overpaid (hardly), and most major school districts—including several in Clackamas County—will face big budget problems in the next biennium. Continue reading

Facts tell Ugly Oregon Story: Why We Remain Behind

invest in oregon logoWhile our website tends to focus on Clackamas County (like no other), we cannot ignore the big picture. Our legislature produces policy concerning the whole state and that includes us.

To that end, we are pleased to present a very well done report citing the need for a major reform to undo the woes imposed upon us by the anti-taxers. “You get what you pay for” is an old axiom which certainly applies now.

In this case, Oregonians are getting what they’re paying for, and it is clearly not enough. Reform is needed.

Our legislature tends to be timid when major reform is afoot, and this situation is no different. Perhaps after we review the facts, some things can be turned around and improved.