Tag Archives: Jim Bernard

Around the County – 4/26/17

We Wind Up Paying Bigger Bills When GOP Shirks Responsibility

By Peter Toll

One of the problems with Republicans is the first thing they do is start dismantling stuff in an effort to “get government off our backs” and, at the same time, lower taxes. Republicans now controlling all branches of the federal government remind us of their short-sighted propensities daily.

The best local examples of this foolishness in office are John Ludlow and Tootie Smith, recently unelected Clackamas County Commissioners. They almost literally fiddled while the county’s roads and infrastructure all but collapsed around them over the past four years. Continue reading

An Important Letter from Four Clackamas County Mayors

four-mayors

l-r: Mayors Axelrod (West Linn), Gamba (Milwaukie), Holladay (Oregon City), and Knapp (Wilsonville)

Voters of Clackamas County:

The last four years have been hard on Clackamas County. Working relationships with other area governments have suffered. Positive forward progress has largely stopped. Lawsuits, acrimony and conflict have flourished. County staff morale appears at an all time low. A citizen itemized $3.4 million of public money has been unnecessarily wasted by Clackamas County actions. Continue reading

County Commission Races Offer Serious Choices

By Peter Toll

bernard_lo

Jim Bernard

ken portrait.small

Ken Humberston

mschrader.small

Martha Schrader

Hardworking Clackamas County Democrats can share the credit for success in key local non-partisan primary election races as they gear up for the fall. Here’s a brief look at the results and some key campaign issues. Continue reading

Big Challenges in County Races

By Peter Toll

JimBernard

JimBernard

Leadership is on the line for Clackamas County as incumbent County Chair John Ludlow is under serious attack on three fronts, while two other county commissioners face their own election challenges.

Lackluster Ludlow, known more for bullying than any serious accomplishments in his more than three years in office, faces challenges by two mid-term colleagues on the commission. Jim Bernard and Paul Savas retain their seats if they lose this or the November election.

Also introducing himself into the anti-Ludlow candidates is the only non-commissioner, Oregon City Mayor Dan Holladay. He thinks all three of his opponents act like children and he’d be the adult who could step in and bring order out of the Ludlow-led chaos.

While this is officially a non-partisan race, Ludlow is a staunch Republican who was put into office in 2012 by the tea partiers under an anti-Metro, anti-Portland, anti-mass transit, and anti-tax banner. Ludlow has reflected their interest. He has alienated Metro to the point where Clackamas County is off the radar for Metro grants, usually helpful assistance on regional issues and cooperation. The county is at a low point in regional respect. Continue reading

Ludlow Doubles Down on Keeping Clackamas Closed for New Jobs

By Craig Stephens

Smoke must be coming out of County Commission Chair John Ludlow’s ears as he realizes the fundamental contradiction with his own arguments, like a┬ácomputer imploding in a sci-fi movie when dealing with an internal contradiction of logic.

In an opinion piece in the Nov. 21 Oregonian, Ludlow says that Clackamas County has the highest median family income and highest percentage of high school-educated residents. And yet it lacks jobs compared to other counties, forcing workers into long commutes to get to work. Continue reading

It’s Time to Replace John Ludlow and Tootie Smith

By Craig Stephens

open for business

Open for Business

Voters have put up with the shenanigans and vindictive behavior of John Ludlow and Tootie Smith long enough. Maintaining and improving roads in Clackamas County need to be funded and implemented to support manufacturing, distribution, and farm transit. Timber money has all but disappeared, property tax cannot be used for road maintenance, and gas tax revenue is not enough to keep up with urgent repairs and safety improvements. The funding shortfall has been allowed to escalate to $17 million annually and is increasing each year. A leader is needed to take the best path for our pocketbooks and continue down it for immediate benefit and with a clear plan. Continue reading