Tag Archives: Martin Luther King jr.

Dr. King or Malcolm X? (Answers to the Quiz)

Dr. King was assassinated in Memphis, TN, the day prior to a planned march through downtown in support of Memphis public employees who were seeking to create a union. He understood that civil rights and union rights were both required to have human rights.

The march proceeded when Coretta King arrived to take her husband’s place. The Memphis public employees marched through the streets with signs that read, “I AM A MAN.” These signs conveyed the thought that these workers were not being treated as human beings and that by birth they were entitled to be treated with dignity and respect. Continue reading

Seeking to Understand the Complexity of the Fight for Civil Rights

This is the second in a series of article on the struggle for civil rights in the U.S.

There is a tendency in the white community to deify Dr. King and demonize Malcolm X. Rather than to recognize that each, along with thousands of others, contributed their own distinct part to the struggle for human rights and civil rights in the U.S. That struggle is far from over and rather than seek to divide, all supporters must seek to find common ground.

Take the test below to see if you can determine who said what. Some of these eight quotes came from Dr. King and others came from Malcolm X. Continue reading

A Nation Industrialized on the Backs of Others

This is the first in a series of posts remembering the assassination of Dr. King and the events that preceded and followed.

Slavery is not a part of our history. Since to be a part of our history would suggest that there are other aspects of our history that are separate from slavery. They are not. The wealth that built this country sits on a foundation of capital created by enslaved people. The roots of racism that permeate every aspect of life in America began when the first Yankee financed and shipped African slaves into the Caribbean. How our government operates and even how we elect Presidents are all derived from the institutions of slavery. Continue reading